Our Research Papers

Brand-Specific Alcohol Research

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1. Roberts SP, Siegel MB, DeJong W, et al. Brands matter: Major findings from the Alcohol Brand Research Among Underage Drinkers (ABRAND) project. Published online ahead of print on June 4, 2015. Addict Res Theory. doi: 10.3109/16066359.2015.1051039.This paper summarizes the major findings from the ABRAND project, showing how we have established a new line of research into alcohol marketing and consumption at the brand level and pointing out the major findings and implications of this new line of research.
2. Albers AB, Siegel M, Ramirez RL, et al. Flavored alcoholic beverage use, risky drinking behaviors and adverse outcomes among underage drinkers: Results from the ABRAND study. Am J Public Health 2015;105(4):810-815.This paper analyzes the relationship between the consumption of flavored alcoholic beverages and risky drinking behaviors as well as alcohol-related adverse consequences among underage drinkers.
3. Ross CS, Ostroff J, Naimi TS. Selection of branded alcoholic beverages by underage drinkers. J Adolesc Health2015;56(5):564-570.This paper analyzes the factors associated with the selection of alcohol brands for consumption among underage drinkers.
4. Ross CS, Maple E, Siegel M, et al. The relationship between population-level exposure to alcohol advertising on television and brand-specific consumption among underage youth in the US. Alcohol Alcohol. 2015;50(3):358-364. doi:10.1093/alcalc/agv016.This paper explores the population-level association between exposure to brand-specific alcohol TV advertising and brand-specific alcohol consumption among adolescents.
5. Siegel M, DeJong W, Cioffi D, et al. Do alcohol advertisements for brands popular among underage drinkers have greater appeal among youth and young adults? Subst Abus. 2015:0. doi:10.1080/08897077.2015.1023485.This paper compares the appeal of advertisements for alcohol brands popular among underage drinkers in the U.S to advertisements for alcohol brands unpopular among youth.
6. Borzekowski DLG, Ross CS, Jernigan DH, DeJong W, Siegel M. Patterns of media use and alcohol brand consumption among underage drinking youth in the United States. Journal of Health Communication. 2015;20(3):314-320, doi:10.1080/10810730.2014.965370.This paper identifies four categories of underage youths' media consumption and describes the alcohol brand preferences and drinking behaviors that correspond to the four groups of media users.
7. Roberts SP, Siegel MB, DeJong W, Naimi TS, Jernigan DH. Brand preferences of underage drinkers who report alcohol-related fights and injuries. Substance Use & Misuse. 2015;50(5):619-929, doi:10.3109/10826084.2014.997392.This paper examines the alcohol brand preferences of youth who reported experiencing alcohol-related fights and injuries in the past year, compared to youth who reported no adverse alcohol-related consequences.
8. Belt O, Stamatakos K, Ayers AJ, Fryer VA, Jernigan DH, Siegel M. Vested interests in addiction research and policy. Alcohol brand sponsorship of events, organizations and causes in the United States, 2010-2013. Addiction. 2014;109(12):1977-1985, doi:10.1111/add.12727.This paper describes the number and type of alcohol brand sponsorships (such as concerts and sporting events) identified in the United States between 2010 and 2013.
9. Albers AB, DeJong W, Naimi TS, et al. The relationship between alcohol price and brand choice among underage drinkers: Are the most popular alcoholic brands consumed by youth the cheapest? Substance Use & Misuse. 2014;49(13):1833-43. doi: 10.3109/10826084.2014.935790This paper examines the relationship between alcohol brand prices and underage drinkers' brand-specific alcohol preferences.
10. Siegel M, Ayers AJ, DeJong W, et al. Differences in alcohol brand consumption among underage youth by age, gender, and race/ethnicity – United States, 2012. Journal of Substance Use. 2014:1-9. doi:10.3109/14659891.2014.942402.This paper analyzes the alcohol brand preferences of underage drinkers according to youth demographic characteristics including age, race, and gender.
11. Roberts SP, Siegel MB, DeJong W, et al. A comparison between brand-specific and traditional alcohol surveillance methods to assess underage drinkers’ reported alcohol use. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse. 2014;40(6):447-454. doi:10.3109/00952990.2014.938160.This paper compares underage drinkers' alcohol consumption data assessed via brand-specific alcohol survey to youths' self-reported drinking when measured via traditional quantity-frequency method of alcohol surveillance.
12. Ross CS, Ostroff J, Siegel MB, et al. Youth alcohol brand consumption and exposure to brand advertising in magazines. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. 2014;75(4):615–622. Open Access.This paper describes the relationship between youth exposure to alcohol advertisements in magazines and their reported alcohol brand consumption.
13. Ross CS, Maple E, Siegel M, et al. The relationship between brand-specific alcohol advertising on television and brand-specific consumption among underage youth. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. 2014;38(8):2234-2242. doi: 10.1111/acer.12488.This paper analyzes the association of youth exposure to brand-level alcohol advertising on television with reported brand-specific alcohol use.
14. Roberts SP, Siegel MB, DeJong W, et al. The relationships between alcohol source, autonomy in brand selection, and brand preference among youth in the USA. Alcohol & Alcoholism. 2014;49(5):563-571. doi: 10.1093/alcalc/agu034.This paper examines how and from whom underage drinkers in the United States obtain alcohol, their autonomy in brand selection, and their reported alcohol brand preferences.
15. Naimi TS, Siegel M, DeJong W, et al. Beverage- and brand-specific binge alcohol consumption among underage youth in the US. Journal of Substance Use. 2014:1-7. doi:10.3109/14659891.2014.920054.This paper examines the beverage and brand-specific alcohol consumption behavior of underage drinkers who reported binge drinking.
16. Nhean S, Nyborn J, Hinchey D, et al. The frequency of company-sponsored alcohol brand-related sites on Facebook™ –2012. Substance Use & Misuse. 2014;49(7):779-82. doi:10.3109/10826084.2014.880177.This paper describes the presence of alcohol brand-related sites on the Facebook™ social networking website.
17. Siegel M, Chen K, DeJong W, et al. Differences in alcohol brand consumption between underage youth and adults—United States, 2012. Substance Abuse. 2015;36(1):106-112, doi:10.1080/08897077.2014.883344.This paper compares the alcohol brand preferences of underage drinkers to the brand preferences of adult drinkers, and identifies brands that are disproportionately consumed by youth.
18. Jernigan DH, Rushman AE. Measuring youth exposure to alcohol marketing on social networking sites: Challenges and prospects. Journal of Public Health Policy. 2014;35(1):91–104. doi:10.1057/jphp.2013.45.This paper examines policies of the major social networking sites Facebook, Twitter and YouTube that are intended to protect youth from exposure to branded alcohol content.
19. Fortunato EK, Siegel M, Ramirez RL, et al. Brand-specific consumption of flavored alcoholic beverages among underage youth in the United States. The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse. 2014;40(1):51-57. doi:10.3109/00952990.2013.841712.This paper describes the prevalence of flavored alcoholic beverage (FAB) consumption among underage drinkers, and lists the most popular FAB brands consumed by youth.
20. Kponee KZ, Siegel M, Jernigan DH. The use of caffeinated alcoholic beverages among underage drinkers: Results of a national survey. Addictive Behaviors. 2014;39(1):253-258. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.10.006.This paper describes the prevalence of caffeinated alcoholic beverage (CAB) consumption among underage drinkers, and associated risky drinking behaviors.
21. Siegel M, Johnson RM, Tyagi K, et al. Alcohol brand references in U.S. popular music, 2009-2011. Substance Use & Misuse. 2013;48(14):1475-1484. doi:10.3109/10826084.2013.793716.Using qualitative research methods to analyze song lyrics, this paper reports on which alcohol brands are frequently mentioned in music genres popular among U.S. youth in 2009-2011.
22. Siegel M, DeJong W, Naimi TS, et al. Brand-specific consumption of alcohol among underage youth in the United States. Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. 2013;37(7):1195–1203. doi:10.1111/acer.12084.This paper is the first to report comprehensive, nationally representative data on the brand-specific alcohol consumption of underage drinkers in United States.
23. Albers AB, DeJong W, Naimi TS, et al. Minimum financial outlays for purchasing alcohol brands in the U.S. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 2013; 44(1):67-70. doi: 10.1016/j.amepre.2012.08.026.Using online alcohol price data and information on minimum available container sizes, this paper reports the minimum financial outlay required to purchase different alcohol brands in the United States in 2012.
24. Siegel M, Grundman J, DeJong W, et al. State-specific liquor excise taxes and retail prices in 8 US states, 2012. Substance Abuse. 2013;34(4):415–421. doi:10.1080/08897077.2013.792314.Using online alcohol price data for 45 brands, this paper examines the relationship between state excise taxes and liquor prices in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Jersey, and New York in 2012.
25. Siegel M, Albers AB, DeJong W, et al. Differences in liquor prices between control state-operated and license-state retail outlets in the United States. Addiction. 2013;108(2):339–347. doi:10.1111/j.1360-0443.2012.04069.x.Using online alcohol price data from 13 control states and 50 license state liquor stores with online prices, this papercompares the average prices for 74 brands of liquor between control and license states in the U.S. in the year 2012.
26. DiLoreto JT, Siegel M, Hinchey D, et al. Assessment of the average price and ethanol content of alcoholic beverages by brand -- United States, 2011. Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research 2012; 36(7):1288-1297. doi: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2011.01721.x.Using online alcohol price data from 15 control states and 164 online alcohol stores, this paper reports the average alcohol price and percent alcohol by volume for 900 brands of alcohol, across 17 different alcoholic beverage types, in the United States in 2011.
27. Tanski SE, McClure AC, Jernigan DH, et al. Alcohol brand preference and binge drinking among adolescents. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine 2011; 165(7):675-676. doi: 10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.113.This paper assesses the favorite alcohol brands among 1734 adolescents from all regions of the United States.
28. Siegel M, DiLoreto J, Johnson A, et al. Development and pilot testing of an internet-based survey instrument to measure the alcohol brand preferences of U.S. youth. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research 2011; 35(4):765-772. doi: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2010.01394.x.This paper describes the development of our new, internet-based survey instrument to assess brand-specific alcohol consumption among youth and establishes the feasibility of this new methodology.
29. Siegel M, DeJong W, Naimi TS, et al. Alcohol brand preferences of underage youth: Results from a pilot survey among a national sample. Substance Abuse 2011; 32(4):191-201. doi: 10.1080/08897077.2011.601250.This paper presents the results of a pilot study in which we demonstrated the feasibility, validity, and potential impact to the field of our proposed methods for investigating brand-specific alcohol consumption among underage youth.
30. Binakonsky J, Giga NM, Ross C, et al. Jello shot consumption among older adolescents: A pilot study of a newly identified public health problem. Substance Use and Misuse 2011; 46(6):828-835. doi: 10.3109/10826084.2010.538886.This paper demonstrates one potential impact of this new line of research: the identification of new aspects of alcohol consumption among underage youth. In this paper, we report for the first time the use of jello shots as a form of alcohol consumption, showing that the amount of alcohol consumed by youth in this form is substantial.
31. Giga NM, Binakonsky J, Ross C, et al. The nature and extent of flavored alcoholic beverage consumption among underage youth: Results of a national brand-specific survey. American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 2011; 37(4): 229-234. doi: 10.3109/00952990.2011.568558.This paper demonstrates another potential impact of this new line of research: improvement of our understanding of youth drinking behavior by providing information on a brand level. Here, we show that our existing understanding of the nature of flavored alcoholic beverage consumption among underage youth was flawed because of the failure to study the problem on a brand-specific basis.
32. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY). Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising on Television, 2001-2009. Baltimore, MD: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, December 15, 2010.This report presents estimates of brand-specific, television alcohol advertising exposure among underage youth and identifies the leading advertised brands in terms of disproportionate youth exposure.
33. Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth (CAMY). Youth Exposure to Alcohol Advertising in National Magazines, 2001-2008. Baltimore, MD: Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, August 10, 2010.This report presents estimates of brand-specific, magazine alcohol advertising exposure among underage youth and identifies the leading advertised brands in terms of disproportionate youth exposure.


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